Web Tools for Video and Audio Feedback on Essays and Projects

“I think it’s very important to have a feedback loop, where you’re constantly thinking about what you’ve done and how you could be doing it better.” – Elon Musk

This year I am teaching college English language learners reading and writing.  My students submit their work on Canvas. My students are language learners and pointing out their grammar errors for them to improve upon is important, especially if they continue studying in an American college. Providing specific feedback on a learning management system (LMS) can be time-consuming. Adding comments through Word or Google Docs is time consuming and rarely do students check these comments. Rubrics are time-consuming even with features like repeat comments. Rubrics don’t really help learners see their specific errors. I believe highlighting areas in their work with my feedback is the most helpful for students. That is why I still like providing feedback through screencasting. I first learnt about this method some years ago from Russell Stannard. Below is a helpful video followed by some recommended web tools to help get you started providing video and audio feedback. If you like these ideas then be sure to check out my new book published in August 2017, Hacking Digital Learning Strategies: 10 Ways to Launch EdTech Missions in Your Classroom.

Get your copy of my books, The 30 Goals for Teachers or Learning to Go. Ask me about training your teachers, ShellyTerrell@gmail.com!

Recommended Web Tools

  • Peergrade is a free online platform to quickly facilitate peer feedback sessions with students. Students turn in assignments as documents or video and each assigned to a peer who grades with a rubric.
  • Screencastify is a Google Chrome extension and my favorite way to provide quick video feedback. Students don’t need to register. Simply, install this free extension from the  Chrome Store.  When you first click on the extension you will need to allow the videos to go to your Google Drive. From here it is simple, quick and easy. When you have the paper on your screen or browser, click the extension and begin recording. When you are finished you are given a link to copy and easily send to students. I provide this link to the comments section on Canvas. Students are then able to watch the video and see and listen to my feedback.
  • Screencast-o-matic is a web tool, which allows screencasts up to 15 minutes with the free version. It is a good free option and students don’t register.
  • Nimbus is another extension for screencasting and alsoa powerful screen capture tool. It is great for creating visual how-to guides.
  • Jing is a software you download that allows up to 5 minute recordings.
  • Another way to screencast is through Youtube Live (formerly Google Hangouts on Air). The recordings are uploaded to Youtube for students to easily access. The set-up is lengthy and you have to enable an Adsense account for any embedding. Use the Youtube editor to edit the video.
  • You can also provide audio feedback without video through Kaizena. Your students need a code to access the recordings, which I still think is an extra step too many but you can set up classes and send group messages and feedback to the class.

Challenge: Try one of these ideas for providing video or audio feedback to your students.

If you enjoyed these ideas, you may want to get your copy of The 30 Goals for Teachers or my $5.99 ebook, Learning to Go, which has digital/mobile activities for any device and editable/printable handouts and rubrics.

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Shelly Terrell

Shelly Sanchez Terrell (@ShellTerrell) is an award winning digital innovator, an international speaker/consultant, and the author of Hacking Digital Learning with EdTech Missions, The 30 Goals Challenge for Teachers, and Learning to Go. She has trained teachers and taught English language learners in over 20 countries as an invited guest expert by organizations, like the US Embassy, UNESCO Bangkok, Cultura Inglesa of Brazil, the British Council in Tel Aviv, IATEFL Slovenia, HUPE Croatia, ISTEK Turkey, and Venezuela TESOL. She has been recognized by several organizations and publications as a leader in the movement of teacher driven professional development as the founder and organizer of various online conferences, Twitter chats, and Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Two of the projects she co-organized were shortlisted for ELTons, #ELTChat and the Virtual Round Table Language and Technology online conference. She was named Woman of the Year by the National Association of Professional Women, awarded a Bammy Award as a founder of #Edchat, and named as one of the 10 Most Influential People in EdTech by Tech & Learning. Her greatest joy is being the mother of baby Savannah and Rosco the pug. Shelly has an Honors BA in English with a Minor in Communication and a specialization in Electronic Media from UTSA, a Masters in Curriculum Instruction ESL from the University of Phoenix, and a CELTA from CELT Athens. She regularly shares her tips for effective technology integration via Twitter (@ShellTerrell), Facebook.com/ShellyTerrell, and on her blog, TeacherRebootCamp.com, which has won several awards and recognitions as one of the top ESL, Edtech and Elearning blogs. Find over 400 of her slide presentations at https://www.slideshare.net/ShellTerrell/presentations

3 comments

  1. Audio comments can also be created using the website Vocaroo.com

    Once recorded, the teacher would click on the save audio option to receive a URL to the recording. This could be copied & pasted as a comment in Google Classroom or in a Doc, etc.

  2. Along with Vocaroo, Talk&Comment is an add-on/app that many are raving about. My concern with both is that neither give you control of your data. I don’t even think Kaizena does either. Why is it so easy to keep video in my Drive folder, yet audio is so difficult? Feel like I’m missing something.

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