Goal 4: Leave it Behind #30Goals

Goal 4 of The 30 Goals Challenge 2011

Goal

Short-term
Option A: Make a list of ways you can leave your stress behind and not carry it with you into the classroom. To take this a step further, try one of these stress relievers today and share the experience with us.
Option B: Take a class period and have your students develop their own stress relief plans. The idea is that when they begin to misbehave in the classroom they are able to have time to implement their plan before they are punished.

Long-term– Develop a stress-relief routine that will ensure that even during the most stressful times of the year (i.e. testing time, grading time) you won’t be in a bad mood in the classroom. How can we begin to show our students how to develop stress routines for themselves? Spend a class having students work in pairs or groups to share their stress-relief plans. To go further, when the students are stressed and act up then remind them of their plans and allow them the time to try this out instead of just punishing the student.

Quote

Plato Kind quote Flickr

Ideas?

Challenge:

Make a list of ways you can leave your stress behind and not carry it with you into the classroom. Try one of these today!

Did you reflect on this goal? Please leave a comment that you accomplished this goal by either posting your own video reflection on Youtube, using the hashtag #30Goals, posting on the 30 Goals Facebook group, adding a post to the 43 Things web/mobile app, or adding a comment below! Feel free to subscribe to The 30 Goals podcast!

Keep an eye out for the book, The 30 Goals Challenge for Educators, that will be published by Eye on Education in the Fall of 2011!

Background music is Silent Motions by Morgantj from CC Mixter

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Shelly Terrell

Shelly Sanchez Terrell is a teacher trainer, instructional designer, adjunct professor, and the author of The 30 Goals Challenge for Teachers: Small Steps to Transform Your Teaching and Learning to Go: Lesson Ideas for Teaching with Mobile Devices, Cell Phones and BYOT. She has been recognized by the ELTon Awards, The New York Times, the Ministry of Education in Spain, and Microsoft’s Heroes for Education as an innovator in the movement of teacher-driven professional development and education technology. Recently, she was named Woman of the Year 2014 by Star Jone’s National Association of Professional Women and awarded a Bammy Award as a founder of #Edchat, the Twitter chat that spurred over 400 teacher chats. She has trained teachers and taught learners in over 25 countries and has consulted with organizations worldwide such as UNESCO Bangkok, The European Union aPLaNet Project, Cultura Iglesa of Brazil, the British Council in Tel Aviv, IATEFL Slovenia, HUPE Croatia, and VenTESOL. She shares regularly via TeacherRebootCamp.com, Twitter (@ShellTerrell), and Facebook.com/shellyterrell. Her greatest joy is being the mother of Rosco the pug.

14 comments

  1. This is a wonderful goal. I especially like your comments about how some of our kids that act out are likely dealing with a lot of stress themselves. I have several things that I do to relieve stress –
    Workout
    Listen to audio books when I travel, one I highly recommend is Things I Overheard While Talking to Myself by Alan Alda.
    Go to lunch or for coffee with a friend.
    Go to the office. (I travel a lot and work from home when I don’t have specific workshops or meetings to be at. From time to time I go to the office to work and touch base with my colleagues. If I need to be around people on home office days our public library has wireless access so I go there.)
    Meditating, sketching and listening to music are other things I find helpful.

    • Hi Evelyn!

      Listening to audio books is a great idea as well as time with friends. I think spending time with friends is definitely important especially if they aren’t necessarily educators because then you don’t talk about your day so much but get a break and relax.

  2. First, this is such a great goal! I definitely need to leave things behind sometimes.

    Secondly, Ry was so excited about his shout out. There were no words (which isn’t very often)…only a HUGE smile and giggles. 🙂

  3. Shelly,
    I love this format with the video complementing your written work! As always, you inspire me so much. I love this goal, in particular, because it reminds us that we have a choice in each moment, to cling to what is stressing us out, or to refocus our attention on something else.
    A few things that help me:
    1) Talking to friends on the phone on my commute home. A coworker and I laugh hysterically as we recount an event from the day that seemed so serious at the time but looks different from a shared lens.
    2) Listening to inspiring TED talks on the way to work.
    3) Starting the class session with my students by showing them a beautiful picture and allowing them to savor it and write about it. This puts us all in a broader, more positive mood!
    4) Thich Naht Han has some beautiful meditations that always help me. http://www.oprah.com/spirit/Thich-Nhat-Hanhs-Audio-Meditation-Flower-Fresh
    And, as you said, reaching out to my wonderful online network always helps.
    Thanks so much for sharing!

    • Hi Joan!

      Hearing from you always brightens my day! I love the TED talks and coworker ones. I used to have these ongoing sushi dates with my girlfriends every Thursday in the US. I miss those so much!

  4. http://reflectrepentreboot.blogspot.com/2011/02/goal-4-leave-it-behind.html

    * Clean out those drawers (yes “those” drawers) in my desk… c’mon you have them too!
    * Bring back plants into the Media Lab (a great way to soften the edges of the tech world)
    * Identify more ways to delegate work to students (they can learn to upgrade FlashPlayer!)
    * Be sure to chat a bit with students when class begins instead of jumping right into the work
    * Add the latest student pictures to the walls
    * Simplify, simplify, simplify

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