30 Goals

Goal 2: Re-Evaluate Value #30Goals

Goal 2 of The 30 Goals Challenge 2011


Short-term- Change the way you assess one assignment or project and try to assess in a way that doesn’t add a numerical value but has the student seek value in the progress made, the learning achieved, or the work put into it. For the teachers on holiday, like in Argentina, just reflect on how you will change the assessment process of a project. Alternatively, think about a way to help students re-evaluate how they value themselves. Is it only through a number?

Long-term- In what ways can we help our students re-evaluate the way they value themselves? What changes to assessment can we make to have students reflect more on the learning journey instead of being programmed to place value only on the score?


“Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted.”

by Albert Einstein

Related links with ideas!


Re-evaluate how you will assess at least one assignment! Please share with us your thoughts!

Did you reflect on this goal? Please leave a comment that you accomplished this goal by either posting your own video reflection on Youtube, using the hashtag #30Goals, posting on the 30 Goals Facebook group, adding a post to the 43 Things web/mobile app, or adding a comment below! Feel free to subscribe to The 30 Goals podcast!

Keep an eye out for the book, The 30 Goals Challenge for Educators, that will be published by Eye on Education in the Fall of 2011!

Background music is Gurditation by Teru from CC Mixter

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  • February 2, 2011 - 09:53 | Permalink

    I love this project!
    It makes me think of the things I am doing anyway in a different light!
    Thank you!

  • Fzzxtchr
    February 2, 2011 - 10:57 | Permalink

    Great thoughts on breaking big things into small bits. I encounter so many teachers who are unwilling/able to change anything because only see the final result instead of the small intermediate steps.

    So many students don’t think teachers value what they write/produce/create and sadly a lot of teachers do not.

    Thanks for articulating what so many teachers have a hard time doing!

    • February 2, 2011 - 20:58 | Permalink

      Thank you Jody for sharing. It is sad that many teachers don’t. Part of it is the system that forces them to teach to the test.

  • February 2, 2011 - 15:52 | Permalink

    Great thinking on writing down all of your short and long term goals! You are definitely on the right track in terms of letting students stop to think about how they value themselves. This is an important quality for students and any other life-long-learner out there! Thank you for the continued inspiration!


  • February 2, 2011 - 16:27 | Permalink

    I think today’s goal carries an important message. Too often all of us place value on things that don’t matter. For students grades are important for a barometer of how much they are absorbing of a subject but the grades aren’t the most important thing. Instilling a love of learning so students want to be life long learners should be the ultimate goal. It’s understandable that students who struggle with grades are not enthusiastic about learning. I don’t believe it is because they don’t want to or can’t learn. It is likely the adults in their life view grades as an indicator of success or failure. Those adults have the best of intentions. That is how they were taught. I am hopeful that we are starting to understand that change does not mean what we have done in the past was wrong. It’s just time we embrace all the wonderful new tools we have and be engage our students in new ways.

    • February 2, 2011 - 20:57 | Permalink

      I believe you’re right when you say those adults have the best intention. My father would be upset I didn’t get 100 on everything but we lived in a really poor area where college was not the norm. I’m the first generation to attend college as well as my 4 sisters. This isn’t true for my extended family, though. My father pushed us because he had the best intentions. When schools change the focus then I believe people will begin to see the difference.

  • dee8906
    February 2, 2011 - 17:33 | Permalink

    Re-evaluating what I felt was important in my teaching career. I certainly felt that imparting information was at the top of the list. This was also during the information dark ages…pre internet. But I also thought this was my main role. I think I felt and sometimes still feel the need to get information across to my students. Lately, I have been more interested in opening the door, so to speak. I feel I just need to let them see that there is information out there for them to interact with. I see my role much more as a facilitator, co-learner, learning partner, guide, tour director, etc. This has been a BIG re-evaluation for me. I will continue to re-evaluate this concept thanks to my PLN.

    • February 2, 2011 - 20:55 | Permalink

      Thank you for sharing that. I think many teachers start of this way until some experience shows us a different way of learning. Love my PLN!

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  • February 2, 2011 - 21:37 | Permalink

    Hi Shelly! I’m afraid I’m a bit late but here’s my answer to goal nÂș 2: http://sabridv.wordpress.com/2011/02/03/re-evaluate-value-by-using-rubrics-part-1/

  • February 2, 2011 - 23:09 | Permalink

    Initially I had a rough time thinking about this challenge. We live in a society that demands the numbers and train the students to expect that. Without the end result, they tend not to place a lot of value in the work. I’d like to work on changing that. I see this challenge as a long term one, but one that I’m starting today.

  • February 2, 2011 - 23:20 | Permalink

    Initially I had a rough time thinking about this challenge. We live in a society that demands the numbers and train the students to expect that. Without the end result, they tend not to place a lot of value in the work. I’d like to work on changing that. I see this challenge as a long term one, but one that I’m starting today.

  • Karissa
    February 3, 2011 - 04:04 | Permalink

    Another amazing goal! I want to do this so badly. I want my kids to realize that the grade doesn’t matter, and that it is all about their learning. And yet, I can’t seem to get this across. It is my first year teaching, and it seems like all of the stereotypical “mistakes” are being made no matter how many blogs or tweets I read, or amazing educators I follow and desire to emulate. I am going to make another effort though, and create my own rubric for a presentation my students have coming up. I am also going to spend some class time explaining this rubric, and how I want them to think about their assessment on the project. We’ll see what happens. Thanks again for the inspiration!

  • February 4, 2011 - 00:55 | Permalink

    Fantastic challenge! We all need to consider how our assessments help shape what our students think about themselves. Are we shaping them in ways that make them believe in themselves as learners or making them believe that no matter how hard they try, they aren’t successful learners? This is an important question and goal to tackle!

  • Dvora
    March 13, 2011 - 00:14 | Permalink

    So I have been reflecting on this this alot in the last few weeks. Had a great conversation with a colleague about my plans for next year. It is touch to make this kind of change when it is very different from the culture of the norm in a place. I came in mid-year and am working hard to keep up and move forward, but I am working on the game plan to implement for next year.

  • March 13, 2011 - 00:46 | Permalink

    I posted a reflection on national assessment vs. introduction of portfolio assessment. I think this is something we can do, even if portfolios are not ‘accepted’ as ‘legitimate’ qualifications, no-one with any sense is going to reject someone with physical evidence of what they can do, are they?


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