What Does Your Hashtag Use Say About You? 16 Resources

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#Edchat, #Edtech, #Elearning, #Edreform, #TEFL, #30Goals, #NewEdblog, and #Nightshift are the hashtags you’ll see me mostly use on Twitter. I have a bit of a romance with hashtags. When you use hashtags on Twitter you are doing more than just categorizing your tweets. Using a hashtag sends a message about you to other followers. If I look at the hashtags you use, then I glean information about you, such as:

  • what interests you
  • what you may be a subject matter expert (SME) about
  • what you like to identify yourself with
  • what your passions are
  • who you connect with
  • what you believe in

When I use these hashtags, this is what I reflect. I am sending my followers messages. They now I am passionate about using technology, especially free web 2.0 tools, effectively with my students (#Edtech and #ELearning). They know I support new education bloggers (#NewEdblog). They know I stay up late sharing music and stories with my dear friends on the #NightShift! These are just a few of the examples. I use many more hashtags and participate in several educational chats on Twitter. Hashtags are part of the language of Twitter. They are searchable links that people can explore and keep current with the latest trends, links, and information in their fields. Hashtags are what allow us to collaborate and communicate with our friends on Twitter. They help establish a community and develop relationships that go far beyond social media and impact our classrooms, schools, and conferences.

Hashtags also help us follow presentations and have a back channel with others about the presentation in real-time. I love seeing live presentations and chatting with my friends about it on Twitter. It is a shared experience that connects us.

Hashtag Resources

Useful Links

Links Specifically for Hashtag Discussions

  • Education Chats on Twitter– Find out the dates and times of educational conversations that occur on Twitter. Another Cybraryman page.
  • Spreadsheet of Twitter Chats– This is a Google doc of over 100 Twitter chats with links and times. This was shared by @ESOLCourses, Sue Lyon-Jones
  • Tweeting With Your Twitter Community: How To Participate In A Twitter Chat
  • Find several Twitter tools in this post for backing up hashtag discussions
  • TwapperKeeper– Archive any hashtag, keyword, or person’s tweets. Enter the start date, order, timeframe, and limit. When your archive is ready, the service will tweet you. This is a hard copy of your tweets for your hard drive or to send others.
  • Summarizr– Find out detailed analytics of any hashtag discussion archived through Twapper Keeper
  • The Archivist– The main way Jerry Swiatek archives #Edchat transcripts. This only works with a PC and is software you download. This gives you more control of your archive so you have a hard copy as well as the ability to include this in a wiki, blog, or website.
  • What the Hash Tag– This site is mentioned again because if you register your Twitter hashtag, then you can add links to important blog posts, include a description, receive statistics about the hashtag, and receive free transcripts for a month. To save the transcripts simply copy and paste them in a wiki, blog, or document. You can also save them as PDF.
  • Tweet Doc– Archive any hashtag or keyword in a PDF file. You can set up the date and time ranges, tweet limits and company logos.
  • Google Reader– Use your Google Reader account to subscribe to your favorite hashtags. Then create a Bundle which will allow you to export all the materials onto a website which automatically updates. To save a hard copy then save as a PDF.
  • Tweet Grid– Follow hashtag discussions easily in various columns. I use this free service along with Tweetdeck to moderate #Edchat
  • Tweet Chat– Follow hashtag discussions easily and every tweet you send has the hashtag you want already added.

Useful Videos

Using Tweet Deck for Hashtag Discussions

#Edchat: Join the Movement

Challenge:

If you are not currently using hashtags, choose a couple you feel comfortable using and tweet with them.

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How else do you believe hashtags help build a community?

Shelly Terrell

Shelly Sanchez Terrell is a teacher trainer, instructional designer, adjunct professor, and the author of The 30 Goals Challenge for Teachers: Small Steps to Transform Your Teaching and Learning to Go: Lesson Ideas for Teaching with Mobile Devices, Cell Phones and BYOT. She has been recognized by the ELTon Awards, The New York Times, the Ministry of Education in Spain, and Microsoft’s Heroes for Education as an innovator in the movement of teacher-driven professional development and education technology. Recently, she was named Woman of the Year 2014 by Star Jone’s National Association of Professional Women and awarded a Bammy Award as a founder of #Edchat, the Twitter chat that spurred over 400 teacher chats. She has trained teachers and taught learners in over 25 countries and has consulted with organizations worldwide such as UNESCO Bangkok, The European Union aPLaNet Project, Cultura Iglesa of Brazil, the British Council in Tel Aviv, IATEFL Slovenia, HUPE Croatia, and VenTESOL. She shares regularly via TeacherRebootCamp.com, Twitter (@ShellTerrell), and Facebook.com/shellyterrell. Her greatest joy is being the mother of Rosco the pug.

7 comments

  1. whoa… packed with great resources… ones we need. thank you so much Shelly. i barely get hashtags.

    “i have a bit of a romance with hashtags.”
    you’re adorable.

  2. I totally enjoy using hashtags! Especially as a brand for me about things I’m passionate about. You will frequently see me use this hashtag:#ntchat.
    That relates to a New Teacher chat (#ntchat)that I moderate with Edutopia. It’s every Wed at 4PM PDT/7PM EDT. It’s MY passion to mentor and support new/pre-service teachers so I love using the #ntchat hashtag when I’m tweeting about topics that new/pre-service teachers an benefit from. I hope some of your readers will join us and pass the word along about New Teacher chat! Thank you Shelly for this great post! 🙂

  3. Uh oh, now I’m a little worried what it says about me from the fact that I make up silly hashtags. Someone is probably collecting them under #sillyhashtags or something like that.

    I think it’s good practice if you RT something and there are no hashtags, to add some.

    All good ideas, thanks Shelly

  4. Shelly, I had no idea there were so many resources that I could use to follow hashtags. Thank you, feel like I have just been schooled in Twitter lingo and practice. I so appreciate you in my PLN, you keep me hip to what is happening in the #edchatosphere 🙂

  5. This is such an amazing collection. I had no idea all of this was available. Thanks agai. For sharing such wonderful information. As always, you rock! 🙂

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